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#JamesDonaldson On #MentalHealth – Why Do #Teens Engage In Self-Harm? Clinical #Psychologists Explain How To Help #Teens Reduce Their Emotional Distress

Kevin Kuehn, PhD Student in Clinical Psychology, #UniversityofWashington and Kevin King, Professor of Psychology, #UniversityofWashington

Nearly 1 in 5 young people worldwide intentionally injure themselves every year.

Emotions are tricky things. They allow for humans to fall in love, wage war and, as it turns out, engage in self-harm.

It is hard to imagine an era in which young #adults were more distressed than today. Recent #CentersforDiseaseControlandPrevention data indicates that more than 40% of #highschool #students reported they felt persistently sad or hopeless over the past year. In the same survey, about 20% reported that they seriously considered #suicide. Worldwide, approximately 17% of youths ages 12-18 intentionally injure themselves each year.

By all accounts, young people are experiencing a seemingly unprecedented level of emotional distress.

Humans tend to behave in a way to seek pleasure and avoid pain. Why then would some intentionally hurt themselves? In a new meta-analysis, a summary of research studies that we and our colleagues published in the journal Nature Human #Behavior, we reported that people felt better immediately after they self-injured or thought about #suicide.

We are a doctoral candidate in clinical psychology at the #UniversityofWashington, researching why youths and young #adults self-injure, and a clinical #psychologist studying young #adult substance use. Our research suggests that this reduction in emotional distress following acts of self-harm and suicidal thoughts likely maintains these types of thoughts and #behaviors.

The challenges with studying #self-harm

In his book “About Behaviorism,” the preeminent #psychologist B.F. Skinner coined the term “reinforcement” to explain why #behaviors are more likely to occur if that same #behavior previously resulted in a desired outcome. Over the past 20 years, leading theories have hypothesized that self-injury operated in the same manner. That is, if someone experienced relief from emotional suffering after they injured themselves, they would be more likely to repeat the #behavior in the future.

Self-injury is difficult to research. Until the last decade, most researchers asked people to reflect on what they were thinking or feeling when they were self-injuring, but those episodes could have been months or even years ago. We humans, though, are remarkably bad at accurately reporting on our own #behaviors, especially when we try to explain why things happened. It’s especially challenging for researchers to get a clear timeline of events, which makes it difficult to pinpoint how someone was feeling immediately before or after they self-injured.

Recently, researchers have tried to fill those gaps by making use of the ubiquity of cellphones. In those studies researchers asked participants to complete brief surveys about how they’re feeling multiple times per day over their cellphones as they go about living their lives.

Our meta-analysis analyzed 38 such survey-based studies, with data contributed from researchers around the U.S. and Europe, involving 1,644 participants. In all the studies, participants rated the intensity of their emotions and indicated whether they had thought about self-injury in the past few hours.

We found that the participants reported higher levels of distress right before they self-harmed or thought about #suicide, and reported significantly reduced levels of distress immediately following. Together, this suggests that relief from distressing emotion acts as a powerful reinforcer, likely increasing the probability that people continue to experience self-injurious thoughts and #behaviors. It also implies that treatments should focus on how to help people replace self-injury with alternative ways of relieving #stress.

Since roughly 40% of people who attempt #suicide do not receive #mentalhealthservices, we think it is important to share strategies for helping individuals at risk of self-harm talk about their emotions and to offer resources for finding professional help.

#James Donaldson notes:

Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.

Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.

Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle

Order your copy of James Donaldson’s latest book,

Celebrating Your Gift of Life:

From The Verge of Suicide to a Life of Purpose and Joy

Strategies for discussing #self-harm

#Teens who self-injure and/or think about #suicide are a heterogenous group – people are unique, after all. However, our finding suggests that self-harm serves an important function for youth: to help regulate emotions.

It is essential that teens experiencing self-injurious thoughts and behaviors find #adults and/or peers to whom they feel connected. The previously mentioned #CDC survey showed that #youths who felt connected were much less likely to contemplate or attempt #suicide than those who did not feel connected. Thus, ensuring that #teens feel cared about and supported or that they “belong” at home and #school may be one way to protect against self-injury.

We’ve found in our clinical work with youths who self-injure that it’s important to balance validating their emotions – in other words, acknowledging and accurately understanding their feelings – while not responding to self-injury in ways likely to inadvertently reinforce it. If, for example, #teens felt as if the only way they received support or validation were to self-harm, then it would be important to ensure that validation is provided when they are not self-harming.

Here are some key ways to validate and show support:

– Pay attention: We all know what it feels like to speak with someone who is not paying attention or is looking at their phone. Make eye contact and show you’re interested in what the person is feeling.

– Reflect back: Summarize what the person is saying to demonstrate that you are listening and taking in the information. You could say something like, “Let me make sure I understand …” and then paraphrase what you’re hearing.

– Try to read their thoughts: Imagine yourself in the person’s shoes or guess what they may be feeling, even if they haven’t said it directly. You could say something like, “I imagine you must be feeling like nobody understands what you’re going through.” If the teen says you’re wrong, give up on being right and try again later.

– Validate based on prior events: Show that you understand how the feelings make sense given what you know about the person. For example, you could ask, “Are there times when you’ve had experiences similar to now?” You could say something like, “I could totally see how you would feel afraid about failing this test, since you studied hard for the last one but didn’t do as well as you wanted.”

– Acknowledge how the feelings make sense in the present: Would other people in that exact same situation have the same feelings? For example, “Anyone would feel afraid.” This communicates to the other person that there isn’t anything wrong with the way they’re thinking and feeling. You won’t be able to validate everything; for instance, you shouldn’t validate that self-injuring is an effective response to distress. However, you can validate that self-injuring is understandable because it can provide temporary emotional relief even if it causes problems in the long run.

– Be “radically genuine”: Be authentic and try to show the other person you respect them and care about them. Treat them as a person of equal status who has important expertise about how to help solve the problem of their self-harm.

Extending a helping hand

It’s important for people to know that help is available. The #NationalSuicidePreventionLifeline (800-273-8255) is free for anyone experiencing emotional distress. Now Matters Now is another free resource that offers coping strategies to manage self-harm and #suicidalthoughts from individuals with lived experience.

Prior research has shown that certain #behavioral interventions, such as cognitive #behavioraltherapy – an approach that focuses on the interplay among thoughts, emotions and #behaviors – or dialectical #behavioraltherapy – a comprehensive treatment package that teaches mindfulness, emotion regulation, distress tolerance and interpersonal coping skills – are effective at reducing self-injurious thoughts and #behaviors. Both treatments are designed to provide individuals with skills for recognizing their emotions as well as changing their feelings without self-injuring.

Find a cognitive #behavioraltherapist

Find a #therapist who provides dialectical #behavioraltherapy, ideally a #therapist who has been certified by the DBT-Linehan Board of Certification who has demonstrated the knowledge and ability to deliver DBT with adherence to the manual.

This article is republished from The Conversation, a nonprofit news site dedicated to sharing ideas from academic experts. It was written by: Kevin Kuehn, #UniversityofWashington and Kevin King#UniversityofWashington.

Read more:

Kevin Kuehn received funding from the #NationalInstituteofMentalHealth.

Kevin King receives funding from the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the National Institute on #Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Self Harm
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#JamesDonaldson On #MentalHealth – 15-Year-Old Latin #School #Student Died By #Suicide After Relentless #Bullying, Lawsuit Alleges, While #School Turned A ‘Blind Eye’

Madeline Buckley, Chicago Tribune

A 15-year-old #student at the Latin School of Chicago was “tormented on a regular basis” by students at the prestigious #school until he died by #suicide in January, a lawsuit filed Monday alleges.

The suit, filed by the boy’s #parents, Robert and Rosellene Bronstein, accuses administrators at the #school of “willful failure” to do anything about the #bullying, even though they received numerous complaints from the boy and his family. The complaint, filed in Cook County, names the #school, a number of employees and #parents of the alleged bullies.

Latin, a top-ranked #school that charges more than $40,000 per year in tuition, includes former first lady Nancy Reagan, former U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Marshall Harlan II and other well-known public figures as alums.

In a statement, the #school called the claims unfounded. It said it “deeply grieves” the death of one of its #students, but that it plans to “vigorously defend itself.”

“The allegations of wrongdoing by the #school officials are inaccurate and misplaced,” the statement read. “The school’s faculty and staff are compassionate people who put students’ interests first, as they did in this instance.”

The boy, identified as N.B. in the suit, transferred to Latin from Francis Parker School due to Latin’s in-person learning during the #COVID-19 #pandemic, according to the complaint.

A #student at the #school, whose parents are named in the suit, spread a false rumor that the boy was unvaccinated, the suit alleges. Though he was vaccinated, the boy was harassed about his perceived vaccination status, the suit says. The Bronsteins reached out to the student’s family about the alleged harassment, according to the suit.

The #bullying escalated from there, according to the lawsuit. He was told by a #teacher in front of a class that he was going “nowhere in life,” the suit alleges, and was #cyberbullied in a group text message thread by members of the junior varsity #basketball team and on the #socialmedia app #Snapchat. A #Snapchat message circulated around the #school said of the boy: “Ur a terrible person.”

#James Donaldson notes:

Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.

Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.

Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle

Order your copy of James Donaldson’s latest book,

Celebrating Your Gift of Life:

From The Verge of Suicide to a Life of Purpose and Joy

On Dec. 13, a #student sent a #Snapchat message to the boy encouraging him to kill himself, the suit alleges.

N.B. then met with a Latin administrator to report the #bullying, the suit says, but the administrator did not discipline any of the #students involved in the #cyberbullying.

Rosellene Bronstein had also been in communication with a #school #counselor about the #bullying, the suit says. At one point, she told the #counselor she believed her son might hurt himself and asked for a recommendation for a #psychiatrist.

Rosellene Bronstein notified #school employees about the #bullying numerous times, but the #school dismissed her concerns as “family issues,” the suit says. In November and October alone, she contacted Latin more than 30 times.

Despite having anti-#bullying policies and a stated “zero tolerance” policy for hate speech, #school administrators turned a “blind eye” to the “increasingly desperate” pleas for help from the Bronstein family, according to the complaint.

The boy also reported the #bullying to a #school dean about “months long abuse” but was disregarded, the complaint says.

He died Jan. 13.

The suit maintains that Latin violated a state law that requires all Illinois schools to investigate reports of #bullying and notify #parents of #students involved. It also accuses the #school of allowing a culture of #bullying, as documented in an #Instagram account that highlights alleged instances of #bullying, harassment and hate speech. The suit says N.B.’s sister was also #bullied at Latin.

After N.B.’s death, Head of School Randall Dunn and some board members “conspired to withhold all of the above information from law enforcement authorities, from the full Latin Board, from other constituents of Latin and from N.B.’s family,” the suit alleges.

The suit asks for an award of $100,000,000 on multiple counts of the suit. In a news release, the Bronsteins said they plan to share any money from the suit with anti-bullying organizations.

They said they demanded the school commit to an outside investigation, but Latin refused.

“My son was so alone,” Rosellene Bronstein said in the release. “Not only were the administrators who were supposed to protect him ignoring his cries for help, but they had the self-serving gall to try to protect their own reputations after his death rather than just having the decency of being honest with his grieving family. This is a legal and moral failure that has caused us indescribable pain and agony.”

For 24/7 help, call the free and confidential #NationalSuicidePreventionLifeline at 1-800-273-8255.

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#JamesDonaldson On #MentalHealth – #MayIsMentalHealthAwarenessMonth

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Tune In and Listen, Saturday, May 7, 2022 at 10AM(PST) to Standing Above The Crowd with James Donaldson with Special Guest this week is Former NBA Player and NBA Hall of Famer Jack Sikma

Join James Donaldson on Standing Above the Crowd sports talk radio show

Saturday, May 7, 2022 at 10am (PST)

Special Guest this week is Former NBA Player and NBA Hall of Famer Jack Sikma

Jack Sikma

Listen to the show live at 347-205-9631

or

Call in and submit your questions to the live show at 347-205-9631

 

Jack Sikma brief information

Jack Wayne Sikma (born November 14, 1955) is an American former professional basketball center. He was a seven-time NBA All-Star with the Seattle SuperSonics, who drafted him in the first round with the eighth overall pick of the 1977 NBA draft. In 1979, he won an NBA championship with Seattle. Sikma finished his playing career with the Milwaukee Bucks. He was elected to the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame in 2019.

He was known for his trademark reverse pivot and step back behind-the-head jumper, coined as the “Sikma move”,[1] along with his distinctive curly, blond hair during his playing days. During his thirteen-year career, he reached the playoffs eleven times and anomalously established himself as an accurate-shooting center. His style of play would become significantly influential for centers at both the amateur and professional levels. Sikma scored 17,287 points in his NBA career.

Personal information
BornNovember 14, 1955 (age 66)
Kankakee, Illinois
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 11 in (2.11 m)
Listed weight230 lb (104 kg)
Career information
High schoolSt. Anne (St. Anne, Illinois)
CollegeIllinois Wesleyan (1973–1977)
NBA draft1977 / Round: 1 / Pick: 8th overall
Selected by the Seattle SuperSonics
Playing career1977–1991
PositionCenter
Number43
Coaching career2003–2014
Career history
As player:
19771986Seattle SuperSonics
19861991Milwaukee Bucks
As coach:
20032007Seattle SuperSonics (assistant)
20072011Houston Rockets (assistant)
20112014Minnesota Timberwolves (assistant)
Career highlights and awards
NBA champion (1979)7× NBA All-Star (19791985)NBA All-Defensive Second Team (1982)NBA All-Rookie First Team (1978)No. 43 retired by Seattle SuperSonics2× First-team NCAA Division III All-American (1976, 1977)Third-team NCAA Division III All-American (1975)3× CCIW Player of the Year (1975–1977)
Career statistics
Points17,287 (15.6 ppg)
Rebounds10,816 (9.8 rpg)
Assists3,488 (3.2 apg)
Stats  at NBA.com
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com
Basketball Hall of Fame as player

Listen to the show live at 347-205-9631

or

Call in and submit your questions to the live show at 347-205-9631

James Donaldson has complied quite a list of accomplishments over the years. Washington State University graduate ’79, Small business owner for 28 years, 40 years involved in his community with youth programs, education, mentoring, women and minority business advocate, political candidate and a 20 year professional basketball, including 14 years in the NBA with an All Star appearance in 1988!   Currently, James is an advocate for mental health awareness and suicide prevention as he is the Executive Director of his own non profit 5013c foundation Your Gift of Life Foundation     Now join James Donaldson as he hosts his own sports radio talk show with a variety of intriguing, inspiring and interesting guest each and every week.   Every Saturday at 10am (PST)
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JamesDonaldson On #MentalHealth – 25 Toxic Things #Latino #Parents Need To Stop Saying To Their #Kids When It Comes To #MentalHealth

#Latinos who have #mentalhealthillnesses oftentimes don’t get the care — or even have access to the care — needed to address them. According to the #NationalAllianceonMentalHealth (#NAMI), just 33% of #Latino #adults with #mentalillness receive the treatment they need each year, compared to the 43% US average.

a cartoon woman lying in bed
And according to #MentalHealthAmerica (MHA), approximately 10 million US #Latinos report having a #mentalhealthcondition, with research suggesting that those numbers are continuing to grow.

There are a number of reasons why the level of care received is disproportionate, with language barriers, financial inequities, misdiagnosis, medical racism, and legal status all playing their part. But one of the biggest challenges many #Latinos must face when addressing their #mentalhealth is the #stigma around the illnesses themselves.

#James Donaldson notes:

Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.

Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.

Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle

Order your copy of James Donaldson’s latest book,

Celebrating Your Gift of Life:

From The Verge of Suicide to a Life of Purpose and Joy

a character saying she's not going to work because she doesn't feel well and the mom says she once went to work with a fever of 104 and no one noticed
Netflix

While many #Latino #parents and guardians do try as hard as they can to understand what their #kids are going through, others simply just do not get it or understand it. It’s time to break down this #stigma, so we asked the #Latinos of the BuzzFeed Community to tell us the toxic things they’ve been told by their #parents when addressing #mentalhealth.

Here are 25 of their stories/phrases they’ve heard over and over again:

Warning: This post contains mentions of #suicide, self-harm, and disordered eating.

1.”Like all #parents, #Latino #parents want what’s best for their #kids and are very dedicated to providing that. But with #mentalhealthissues, a lot of the messaging was about how lucky our family was to be here, and things like #depression were more about having the ‘wrong’ perspective. Considering how hard immigrant families have to work to get ahead, and their suspicion of the medical profession due to things like the well-documented racism in the field, that kind of response isn’t surprising.”

—Anonymous

2.”I’ve always been a shy and introverted #kid. I was about 11 or 12 when my pediatrician noticed signs of #depression in me and sat my #parents down to talk about it and what options were available to me. My #dad let my #doctor finish explaining and then told her that I’ll be okay, I’m a strong #girl. Didn’t even think to look into the matter, or get me help, or even ask me about it. My mom told me to just pray and God will help me. I’m 28 now and have never gotten the help I needed. Truth be told, I’ve been living with and burying that #depression (and now #anxiety) for years because I didn’t want to disappoint my #parents and be their ‘strong’ #girl. I’m finally actively looking for professional help now that I don’t live with them.”

leidat2

3.”My dad [died] when I was three, and as I got into my #teen years a lot of major events started to take place — like a quinceañera and proms, etc., and all my friends dads were there, but mine wasn’t. I started to get really down about it and having outbursts of anger and crying and told my mom I needed to see someone. She said I was fine and doing that would hurt me in the future. Took a lot of fighting, but she finally caved and I am so thankful she did. Therapy is still a regular part of my #adult life and honestly I don’t think I’d still be here if it wasn’t for it.”

beckyc4104b26ca

4.”Huevona levántate.”

jalexla

“Get up lazy girl.”

5.”According to my dear Mama, my #depression stems from lacking a relationship with Jesus. Without religious meaning in my life, she’s not surprised I’m having an existential crisis. It couldn’t be because my spouse was falling out of love with me, I held up the house and took care of everything my late father did for her? I love her, but prayer cards don’t hold a candle to Zoloft.”

—Anonymous

6.”Neither of my #parents had the vocabulary to define #mentalhealth, so I had to provide it for them. To them, my #anxiety was me being ‘afraid of everything for no reason.’ My #depression was just a ‘phase’ or me ‘having a bad day.’ This is how it was defined to them as #children, and so they were trying to project that onto me. Their own #mentalwellness was ignored for so long, that they then didn’t even know how to begin addressing mine. In many ways, I am like their #parent now, guiding them through their own unresolved issues as I try to navigate mine. We are all healing together now and I just wish this could have happened sooner for all our sakes.”

—Anonymous

7.”‘Have some food, you’re just hungry.'”

buzzfeed1003

8.”My mom will believe in demons, angels, and ghosts — but when it comes to my #anxiety — it just doesn’t exist to her.”

—Anonymous

9.”My mother would always tell me I was just being lazy, ‘Get up and do something.’ It’s even worse right now as an #adult because I moved away and don’t really have anyone. I lost someone recently that was very close to me and she expects me to bounce back as if nothing happened, which is the reason why I hardly speak to her or the rest of my family these days.”

nikiek2020

10.”As a #teen I was told the books I read put bad ideas into my head. Calling me fat, and I ended up starving myself. When someone reported my self-harm and the #nurse called them, they said they would take care of it and instead decided prayer was the way to go. It took me many years to forgive them and we are better now, but there was a lot of harm done.”

—Anonymous

11.”I used compulsive shopping as a mechanism for #depression and all my dad said was, ‘Oh, you’re addicted to buying shit but not addicted to working?’ GTFO.”

rigop2

12.”My #parents have told me, ‘Es por que no haces nada,’ as if I’m not working a part-time job while also going to #school full-time. They also take it as a personal attack each time I say I’m struggling. They weaponize the sacrifices they’ve made for me as a reason for why I should be happy. I love them and am grateful for everything they do for me, but this ain’t it.”

—Anonymous

“It’s because you don’t do anything.”

13.“’Todos nos ponemos tristes de vez en cuando, lo importante es no dejarse pensar mucho en eso.’ ‘We all get sad sometimes, the important thing is to not think about it too much’ — about my #depression.”

christianflinn

14.”My mom just said that even #psychiatrists are ‘crazy’ and that she knew of one that just committed #suicide. I told her that I’m having trouble sleeping and she immediately told me that she never has any issues sleeping, as if this ‘problem’ I’m going through is not because of her. I sat in front of her for an hour, crying uncontrollably. She never once looked at me and continued to play solitaire on her laptop while I bawled.”

—Anonymous

15.”‘Estas muy chiquita para saber como se siente eso.'”

—Anonymous

“You’re too young to know how that feels.”

16.”I don’t think they have, but I never get to tell my mom that I have #depression. She might just dismiss it and ignore it. Besides that, I’ve just worked everything out myself.”

—Anonymous

17.”Pues deja de pensar en eso.”

—Anonymous

“Well, just stop thinking about that.”

18.”Well, I am a #Latin #American person. I was born and lived all my life in Uruguay hoping to be old enough to study abroad because Uruguay is a small country with no opportunities for artists. Although it is an open-minded country (equal marriage and abortion have been legal for years), its citizens are more closed, and my #parents show it. My mom grew up raising her siblings and says she “never needed a #psychologist,” and my dad says with the number of murders on the continent, it’s better to kill yourself. Such is life every day. My #parents believe that just because they survived a difficult life, I can do the same. This is a problem that can exist everywhere, but almost all my friends go through something similar. #Latino #parents are sweet, but they can hurt too much since they lived through a difficult #childhood. Obviously I know how horrible it was, but they don’t understand that #mentalhealth is not just about how you live.”

—Anonymous

19.”I would have some signs of #anxiety and #depression when I was a #teen. My mom would say, ‘You have no right to feel that way. You should have no worries right now, especially since you are not very smart and make mistakes every day.’ Or she would say that I was saying that as an excuse to get out of things and that my #anxiety was something that only “crazy people would experience”. Thankfully I have opened her eyes to the real meaning and importance of #mentalhealthissues some years ago and she FINALLY gets it.”

—Anonymous

20.”‘Just pray and it will go away. There is no such thing as that, just toughen up.'”

—Anonymous

21.”They completely ignore the fact that most, if not all, my body and self-esteem issues have been caused by their constant jokes and comments since I was four. My mom has basically been my biggest bully and has put a lot of pressure on me being perfect, but won’t support me when I’m feeling depressed or anxious. I went through a really rough time when I was completely burnt out because of grad school and financial issues, and she said it was because I didn’t put enough effort into doing things well. When I had a miscarriage, she basically said it was my fault for not losing weight and not going to church enough, and that I didn’t need to get depressed about it. She thinks therapy is for ‘crazy people’ and pointless, and refuses to accept that her own #childhood trauma made her a narcissist. Even my own #therapist told me I should just not even try talking to my #parents about deep issues because they hurt my #mentalhealth.”

—Anonymous

22.”I was diagnosed with a severe #depression — had tried to end my life more than once. And my mom’s answer was to read a book and pray to get better.”

—Anonymous

23.”The last time I tried to seek therapy for my #depression, my mom forced me to see a priest instead. #Depression isn’t just some demon you can exorcise.”

—Anonymous

24.”Being handed a mop and a broom when I said I wasn’t feeling great mentally and getting told, ‘Ponte a limpiar tu cuarto para que no piensas de esas cosas.’ I don’t think they fully understand just how damaging that kind of reaction is, but I’ve been trying to get them to understand me more as the years go by and I’m getting through to them little by little.”

—Anonymous

“Clean your room so you can stop thinking about those things.”

25.”I think what many #Latinx #parents need to learn is that they need to respect their #children as human beings, period. This idea that their #children owe them respect no matter what [just] for being the #parents, while at the same time barely acknowledging the kids’ basic rights, is outdated and toxic.”

kljflam

Note: some submissions may have been edited for length/clarity.

The #NationalAllianceonMentalIllness helpline is 1-888-950-6264 (#NAMI) and provides information and referral services; GoodTherapy.org is an association of #mentalhealthprofessionals from more than 25 countries who support efforts to reduce harm in therapy.

The #NationalSuicidePreventionLifeline is 1-800-273-8255. Other international #suicide helplines can be found at befrienders.org. The Trevor Project, which provides help and #suicideprevention resources for #LGBTQ #youth, is 1-866-488-7386.

The National Eating Disorders Association helpline is 1-800-931-2237; for 24/7 crisis support, text “NEDA” to 741741.

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#JamesDonaldson On #MentalHealth – #NaomiJudd Died By #Suicide After Longtime Illness: Report

By Erin Keller

#NaomiJudd died by #suicide after long battle with #mentalillness

#NaomiJudd, one-half of the iconic country music duo #TheJudds, reportedly died by #suicide after years of struggling with #mentalillness.

Naomi’s daughters, #Wynonna and #Ashley, said they lost their mom to “the disease of #mentalillness” in a statement released on Saturday.

On Monday, multiple sources told People that the 76-year-old country music icon had killed herself. No further details were provided.

The Post has reached out for comment from representatives of the singers.

Larry Strickland, Naomi’s husband of 32 years, had also previously made a statement. “Naomi Judd’s family request privacy during this heartbreaking time. No additional information will be released at this time,” he said.

Naomi and Wynonna, 57, were inducted into the #CountryMusicHallofFame on Sunday.

“I didn’t prepare anything tonight because I knew mom would probably talk the most,” a tearful Wynonna told the audience at the Nashville ceremony. “I’m gonna make this fast, because my heart’s broken, and I feel so blessed. It’s a very strange dynamic, to be this broken and this blessed.”

Naomi Judd
#NaomiJudd died Saturday at age 76.

#James Donaldson notes:

Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.

Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.

Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle

Order your copy of James Donaldson’s latest book,

Celebrating Your Gift of Life:

From The Verge of Suicide to a Life of Purpose and Joy

SEE ALSO

Judds

#AshleyJudd weeps over mom Naomi’s death: ‘I’m sorry she couldn’t hold on’

“I’m sorry that she couldn’t hang on until today,” a crying Ashley said, adding, “While this is so much about the Judds as a duo, I want to take a moment to recognize my sister, a GOAT.”

Earlier last month, #Naomi and #Wynonna had announced they would reunite for a celebratory final tour that was set to launch in September.

“Though my heart is broken, I will continue to sing,” #Wynonna said on Sunday.

#Naomi had been candid about her #mentalhealthstruggles in the past. In 2016, she revealed her battles with “extreme” and “severe depression” that left her housebound on “#GoodMorningAmerica.”

“[Fans] see me in rhinestones, you know, with glitter in my hair, that really is who I am,” she told anchor Robin Roberts at the time. “But then I would come home and not leave the house for three weeks, and not get out of my pajamas, and not practice normal hygiene. It was really bad.”

“When I came off the tour, I went into this deep, dark, absolutely terrifying hole and I couldn’t get out,” she continued. “I spent two years on my couch.” The country icon further shared that she had considered taking her own life at a bridge near her farm.

What do you think? Post a comment.

In 2016, #Naomi wrote a book, titled “#RiverofTime: #MyDescentIntoDepression and How I Emerged With Hope,” to go public with her diagnosis and to let people know that #mentalillness is “not a character flaw, it’s a stinking disease.”

If you or someone you know is affected by any of the issues raised in this story, call the #NationalSuicidePreventionLifeline at 800-273-TALK (8255) or text Crisis Text Line at 741741.

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#JamesDonaldson On #MentalHealth – #MayisMentalHealthAwarenessMonth

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#JamesDonaldson On #MentalHealth – Staring At An Image Of Yourself On #Zoom Has Serious Consequences For #MentalHealth – Especially For #Women

Roxanne Felig, PhD Candidate in Social #Psychology, University of South Florida and Jamie Goldenberg, Professor of #Psychology, University of South Florida

<span class="caption">Video calls often show people an image of themselves.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class=
Video calls often show people an image of themselves.

In the past few years, people across the world have spent more time on video chat programs like #Zoom and #FaceTime than ever before. These applications mimic in-person encounters by allowing users to see the people they are communicating with. But unlike in-person communications, these programs often also show users a video of themselves. Instead of catching the occasional glimpse of themselves in a mirror, now people are looking at themselves for hours a day.

We are psychologists who study society’s focus on women’s appearance and the consequences of this constant scrutiny. We were immediately fascinated by the new dynamic created by the #Zoom world. While critical for public safety during the #pandemic, we believe that virtual classes, meetings and the like lead to a continuous focus on one’s own appearance – something research suggests is harmful to #mentalhealth, especially for #women.

#Objectification and #self-objectification

#Objectification is a bit of a buzzword, but the meaning is rather literal: being seen or treated as an object. This often comes in the form of sexual #objectification, where bodies and body parts are seen as separate from the person to which they are attached. Advertisements are rife with examples of this, where close-ups of certain body parts are often shown to help market a product, such as a bottle of cologne graphically nestled between a woman’s breasts.

Not surprisingly, women’s bodies are treated as objects way more often than men’s. Because #women and #girls are socialized in a culture that prioritizes their appearance, they internalize the idea that they are objects. Consequently, #women self-objectify, treating themselves as objects to be looked at.

Researchers investigate #self-objectification in experimental studies by having study participants focus on their appearance and then measure cognitive, emotional, #behavioral or physiological outcomes. Research has shown that being near a mirror, taking a picture of oneself and feeling that one’s appearance is being evaluated by others all increase #self-objectification. When you log in to a virtual meeting, you are essentially doing all of these things at once.

#James Donaldson notes:

Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.

Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.

Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle

Order your copy of James Donaldson’s latest book,

Celebrating Your Gift of Life:

From The Verge of Suicide to a Life of Purpose and Joy

What does #self-objectification do?

Thinking of yourself as an object can lead to changes in a person’s #behavior and physical awareness, and has also been shown to negatively affect #mentalhealth in a number of ways. While these experiences with #self-objectification lead both #women and #men to focus on their appearance, #women tend to face many more negative consequences.

Research suggests that experiencing #self-objectification is cognitively taxing for #women. In a seminal study done in 1998, researchers showed that when #women put on a new swimsuit and viewed themselves in a mirror, the #self-objectification this produced caused #women to perform poorly on math problems. Men’s math performance was not affected by this objectifying experience.

Further, experiencing #objectification has #behavioral and physiological consequences. In the aforementioned study, trying on a swimsuit produced feelings of shame among #women, which in turn led to restrained eating. Other research has shown that when #women think of themselves as objects, they speak less in mixed gender groups.

#Self-objectification also leads #women to, in a sense, distance themselves from their own bodies. This can cause worse motor performance as well as difficulty recognizing one’s own emotional and bodily states. One study showed that #girls who were prone to #self-objectification were less physically coordinated than #girls who showed less #self-objectification.

In a paper we published in 2021, our team showed that #women who think of themselves as objects have difficulty recognizing their own body temperature. To test this, we asked #women how cold they felt while standing outside nightclubs and bars on chilly nights. We found that the more a #woman was focused on her appearance, the less connection there was between the amount of clothing she was wearing and how cold she felt.

In some #women, #self-objectification can become the default way of thinking of themselves and navigating the world. High levels of this #self-objectification can be associated with #mentalhealth consequences, including disordered eatingincreased #anxiety over one’s appearance and #depression.

Evidence of harm and how to reduce it

While we are not aware of any research directly exploring the connection between video meetings and #self-objectification, some recent studies suggest that our concerns are well founded.

One study found that the more time #women who are focused on their looks spent on video calls, the less satisfied they were with their appearance. Facial dissatisfaction also seems to play a role in #Zoom fatigue, with #women across all #races reporting higher levels of #Zoom fatigue than their #male counterparts.

For better or worse, the virtualization of daily life is here to stay. One way to reduce the negative effects of endless video meetings is to use the “hide self-view” function during online interactions. This hides your image from yourself but not others.

Turning off self-view is easy to do and may help some people, but many others – including us – feel that this puts them at a disadvantage. This may be because being aware of your appearance has benefits, despite the risk of #self-objectification and the harms it brings. A huge body of research shows that looking attractive has tangible social and economic benefits, for #women more so than for #men. By monitoring your appearance, it is possible to anticipate how you will be evaluated and adjust accordingly. Therefore, we expect that people, especially #women, will continue to keep the camera on for the duration of their #Zoom calls.

A huge amount of previous research suggests that #Zoom calls are a perfect storm for #self-objectification and that the harms disproportionately affect #women. It seems that the already uneven playing field for #women is exacerbated in online social interactions. Any small reprieve from staring at a literal projection of yourself will be a net gain for your well-being, especially for #women.

[The Conversation’s science, health and technology editors pick their favorite stories. Weekly on Wednesdays.]

This article is republished from The Conversation, a nonprofit news site dedicated to sharing ideas from academic experts. It was written by: Roxanne FeligUniversity of South Florida and Jamie GoldenbergUniversity of South Florida.

Read more:

The authors do not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and have disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

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#JamesDonaldson On #MentalHealth – Guest Column: Social, Emotional Consequences Of The #Pandemic May Be Tough To Overcome

Katie Holland

Socializing is a fundamental necessity to remain sane in the face of many life stressors these days. We love to visit Five Points and have a glass of wine, maybe a beer, followed by a sun-kissed stroll and laughter with friends. Socialization is a cool drink on a hot summer day, a way to wind down; to catch up with friends and family.

It is hard to imagine that practically overnight, our entire lifestyle and approach to decreasing #stress can be drastically changed. Going from laughter in the sunshine to dampened and dark rooms with no permitted escape but technology and #alcohol. The mandated lockdowns that we endured from #COVID-19 in 2020 were intense, scary and poorly administrated. Communication errors came from everyone, the #CDC, the local government and even our peers.

The negative effects on #mentalhealth that we endured as a society from the drastic change in lifestyle will take years to address. #Domesticviolence, gunshot wounds, #depression and many other negative health outcomes increased drastically after the start of the lockdown. #Alcohol sales are still on the rise, healthy exercise habits are not increasing (along with dieting habits); #depression and aggressive #behaviors (such as #domesticviolence) are rising.

#James Donaldson notes:

Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.

Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.

Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle

Order your copy of James Donaldson’s latest book,

Celebrating Your Gift of Life:

From The Verge of Suicide to a Life of Purpose and Joy

Holland
Holland

Duval County had 405 emergency room visits from firearm injuries in 2020, in 2019 we had 300 and in 2018 it was 193. In 2020 there were 8,731 reported #domesticviolence offenses in Duval (a rate of 883 per 100,000). An estimated 21 million #adults had at least one major depressive episode in 2020.

We are two years separated from the original lockdowns, but we are not seeing healthy trending habits yet. So, what can we do to better ourselves and the community around us? Some steps we can begin to take are to reduce heavy drinking habits that were possibly formed when we had no other means of entertainment. Two drinks is a good limit to hold ourselves to when casually drinking (or maybe even quit drinking all together).

Let’s also be outside more! Vitamin D is not only good for your skin, but it is also great for #mentalhealth (and no, you cannot get vitamin D through a window …unless you’re nude). Try and limit technology time, when we come home there should not be an expectation to check emails or respond to work-related matters.

There needs to be a work-life balance and the company you work for may not be advertising that. #Socialmedia is a great way to connect, but also an easy way to lose hours of your life. Perhaps set a limit on your phone to only allow an hour of media platforms and yes — that includes news outlets.

One of the easiest habits we can begin is to simply be outdoors for the sake of it. You have to take a phone call? Go for a walk while you are talking on the phone and get fresh air with raw sunlight. Lunch in Avondale? Sit outside and have some shade provided by an umbrella, but still enjoy the crisp breeze on a sunny day while people-watching.

We were forced to change our lives in the wake of a #pandemic and some of us may be stuck in those monotonous, dark, dampened habits. That’s okay. But it’s 2022 and nobody is going to force you to be a better version of yourself than you. So, get outside, get some sun and breathe that non-recirculated air!

Katie Holland is a graduate student in UNF’s Master of Public Health program.

This article originally appeared on Florida Times-Union: Guest column: Social consequences of #pandemic may be tough to overcome

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JamesDonaldson On #MentalHealth – #MentalHealth Matters: There’s No Better Time To Talk About Your #MentalHealth

Heather Loeb

Part of the problem with #mentalillness is its #stigma. It is hard to talk about, and when you do, you could be judged or shamed. That’s the sad reality, but this #MayisMentalHealthAwarenessMonth. Now’s the time to bring it up and have those tough conversations — with your #kids, #parents, friends, family, coworkers.

Now is the time we should realize that #mentalillness affects one in five people while serious #mentalillness (SMI) affects one in 20. These numbers are from 2020, and I imagine they will increase in the next couple of years.

The #NationalAllianceonMentalIllness (#NAMI) states that May is for bringing voices together to advocate for #mentalhealth and access to care. The organization does this through the #NAMI blog, personal stories, videos, #socialmedia and national events. (#NAMI Greater Corpus Christi is holding an awareness event near the end of the month. Go to www.namigcc.org.)

May is Mental Health Awareness Month.
#MayisMentalHealthAwarenessMonth.

#James Donaldson notes:

Welcome to the “next chapter” of my life… being a voice and an advocate for #mentalhealthawarenessandsuicideprevention, especially pertaining to our younger generation of students and student-athletes.

Getting men to speak up and reach out for help and assistance is one of my passions. Us men need to not suffer in silence or drown our sorrows in alcohol, hang out at bars and strip joints, or get involved with drug use.

Having gone through a recent bout of #depression and #suicidalthoughts myself, I realize now, that I can make a huge difference in the lives of so many by sharing my story, and by sharing various resources I come across as I work in this space.  #http://bit.ly/JamesMentalHealthArticle

Order your copy of James Donaldson’s latest book,

Celebrating Your Gift of Life:

From The Verge of Suicide to a Life of Purpose and Joy

What I’d like to highlight this month is the disparity between those who have #mentalillness and those who actually receive help. According to #NAMI, about 4.9 percent were unable to access needed care in 2020. About 17 million people experienced delays or cancellations to be seen, and more than seven million had delays in receiving medication.

Even if you do have access to care, it can be very expensive. I don’t mean to discourage anyone from seeking help — you should — I’m just pointing out a huge problem that shoves many through the cracks.

Mental Health Matters: For some, staying silent about personal struggles can be deadly

I have struggled with #mentalillness for a long time, and in 2019 I was hospitalized. I was fortunate to go to a private hospital and to afford the medications the #doctors prescribed. One of my medications is $800 each month (before my deductible). That’s insane.

I’m now in recovery, but it came at a literal cost. I have friends who aren’t as lucky, friends who fight #mentalillness every day who can’t afford a #therapist or #psychiatrist. It’s heartbreaking. For them recovery is elusive, and that’s just not fair.

Fortunately, our community has many resources. Matter of fact, I attended a “Call to Action for #MentalHealth” event in late March that brought all the #mentalhealthproviders together, hosted by Leadership Corpus Christi (Class 50) and the Coastal Bend Wellness Foundation. Hundreds of people were there representing their agencies and getting to know what resources are available. Our community leaders, including the mayor, county judge and state Rep. Todd Hunter, spoke about #mentalhealthawareness, access to care and programs that could help us. It warms my heart that our leaders recognize the importance here and the fact that #mentalhealth affects everyone. Not everyone is mentally ill, but we need to treat #mentalhealth just as physical health.

Speaking as the communications manager of #NAMI GCC, a lot of the providers work in our silos, not knowing everything that’s out there. The event, which had different panels of professions speaking and answering questions, was eye opening. We all need to work together to get others the help they need. I think the first step following the event was to compile a comprehensive list of providers, making referrals more efficient thus allowing us to serve more community members.

#Mentalhealthcare has no quick fix, but what I experienced after the event makes me see we’re all going in the right direction. That’s amazing.

This May, I urge you to talk about your #mentalhealth (and/or illness) with your loved ones. We raise awareness by sharing our stories, withholding judgment and, sometimes, just showing up. And we need to end the #stigma. The more we talk, the more #mentalillness becomes more normalized.

So keep talking. I know I will.

Heather Loeb
Heather Loeb

For more than 20 years, Heather Loeb has experienced major #depression, #anxiety and a #personalitydisorder, while also battling the #stigma of #mentalhealth. She is the creator of Unruly Neurons (www.unrulyneurons.com), a blog dedicated to normalizing #depression and a member of State Rep. Todd Hunter’s #SuicidePrevention Taskforce.

MIND MATTERS

Now more than ever we need to take care of our #mentalhealth. Guest columnist Heather Loeb discusses why and explores other important #mentalhealth topics in this special series.

This article originally appeared on Corpus Christi Caller Times: #MayisMentalHealthAwarenessMonth: Here’s why that matters

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